*This article was published in the New Straits Times (Life & Times) on 21st August 2010.

Tanjung  Tokong Malay Village, which was once a sleepy “kampung” in the 60s and 70s, has grown into a suburb with rows of flats, overshadowing what is left of the kampung houses. Gone are the seafronts directly opposite the village where the natural sand split and mangrove trees grew. The village now faces vast reclaimed land and its sea view is blocked by modern concrete houses and high rise towers.

Despite the modernisation, the residents have maintained the uniqueness of Malaysian culture — the evening food bazaar, or commonly known as “pasar malam”. The Tanjung Tokong night market operates every Saturday evening and is one of the designated Ramadan food bazaars.

Hussain’s satay stall located right at the junction_resize

During the fasting month, the bazaar is held every evening with stall-owners selling delicacies for the Muslims to break fast. Stalls are lined up along the road which leads to the village. The aroma of cooking wafts through the air as one strolls along the stretch of food stalls. Traditional Malay cuisine are the top draw here, with classics such as ayam percik (grilled chicken), rendang with ketupat or lemang, kuih muih, air bandung, putu mayam, fried noodles and satay.

It is difficult to choose the food given the sheer variety found at the stalls but there are a few stalls to narrow down the choices. One should also look out for the Wawasan Bihun Soup. The beef soup is boiled with many parts of the cow, including the innards. Not many food bazaars have this typical Malay cuisine as it is troublesome to prepare and difficult to lug the huge container of soup to the bazaar. The soup has a distinct aroma of turmeric and herbs. Unlike the soup sold by the Mamaks, Wawasan’s soup is much clearer. It goes well with the turmeric beehoon and the spicy chilli paste.

Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm


Turmeric beehoon for the Wawasan Bihun Soup

Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm

Beef soup with distinct aroma of turmeric and herbs


The mini murtabak is another popular snack Malaysians can never go without. The murtabak is soft and moist, filled with minced beef. The pickled onion is a customized accompaniment, giving it an extra kick.

Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village CharmFood Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm

If you are a fan of glutinous rice, you may want to visit Mak Cik’s stall. The ketupat with rendang is a must buy. There are not many stalls around town offering this triangular wrapper. Mak Cik says it’s time consuming to wrap the ketupat and the number of wrappers she can produce diminishes as she gets older. The rendang is home cooked with rich spices.

Beef rendang with ketupat _resize

Do not be surprised to see durian in Mak Cik’s stall. She also sells pulut durian (glutinous rice with durian) whenever she can get  hold of the spicy fruit. With the coconut cream mixed into the glutinous rice and the durian, the whole mixture is just heavenly, leaving many wanting more. Many were seen queuing up to buy this dessert.

Pulut durian (glutinous rice with durian)_resize

Heavenly dessert of durian, glutinous rice and santan


One of the traditional Malay delicacies is kuih peneram or “telinga keling”. Made from the aromatic gula Melaka and flour, the mixture is shaped into small donut and deep fried till chocolate brown.

Kuih Peneram, a traditional Malay delicacy_resize

The mamak popiah has a strong turmeric aroma on the shredded yambean and with the fried diced taukua, beansprouts, shallots and a paint of sweet chilli sauce on the skin, makes the roll irresistible. The owner proudly claims that the popiah wrapper is homemade.

Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm

Popiah at RM0.60 per roll

Another interesting food I found in this food bazaar is the stir-fried penne. The tubular penne was cooked with minced beef, vegetable and eggs. Besides this, the stall owner also sells the Singapore beehoon.

Tubular penne cooked with minced beef, vegetable and egg_resize

Right at the junction of the road is Hussain’s Satay. The beef and chicken satay goes for RM0.35 each while the more exotic innards (perut) are slightly more expensive. He is helped out by his wife and son, with the wife handling the griller.

Hussain’s satay stall_resize

Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm Food Bazaar at Tanjung Tokong with Village Charm

The satay perut (beef stomach) goes for RM0.50 each


Usually you end up buying more then you need as everything looks tempting. Tanjung Tokong may have lost some of its village charm but when it comes to the food bazaar, the Malaysian eating spirit truly comes alive.

Many stalls lining the street_resize

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This entry was posted on Thursday, September 2nd, 2010 at 1:05 pm and is filed under Halal, Hawker, Malay Cuisine, Mamak/Indian, Media Preview, New Straits Times (Life & Times), Penang, Street Food, Tanjung Tokong, Tidbits and Snacks. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

5 comments so far

 1 

I am proud to say Penang’s Pasar Ramadan is the best!!! KL one though is big, but food not as good.

September 2nd, 2010 at 6:01 pm
 2 

The smoke from the satay stall just yells “Ramadan Bazaar”!! Won’t be complete without it. :)

September 3rd, 2010 at 12:31 pm
 3 

went there last week. bought lots of food and they are all not bad :D

September 3rd, 2010 at 2:26 pm
 4 

I want some pulut durian pls. Yeah, the KL ones only look big but taste can be a hit and miss.

September 5th, 2010 at 8:07 am
 5 

Which part of Tanjong Tokong is this? My sister and I went to hunt for it but the one we went to doesn’t look like this one and we couldn’t find the things you showed here. We got ourselves drenched in rain instead.

September 6th, 2010 at 6:11 pm

Leave a reply

Name (*)
Mail (will not be published) (*)
URI
Comment

Related Posts Widget for Blogs by LinkWithin