In the Kitchen Making Cantonese Steamed Meat Pau / Bao

BY CK Lam

PHOTO STORIES

A weekend in the kitchen making Cantonese steamed pau under the supervision of my mother-in-law is fun and challenging. It is not easy and lots of practice is needed particularly in picking up the edges and wrapping the filling.

For homemade pau, it is always rewarding with endless choices of sweet and savory meat filling. Savory ones include barbecue-flavored char siew pau 叉燒包, lap cheong pau 臘腸包 and sang yoke pau 生肉包. Our recipe calls for chicken, Chinese sausages, black mushrooms and hard-boiled egg.

Flavor is good but the texture so far is not as fluffy compared to those sold outside. And the pau tends to sink a bit after steaming, which had it looking a bit flat. Will try to do better…

Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef - Learning to make steamed barbecue-flavored char siew pau 叉燒包, lap cheong pau 臘腸包 and sang yoke pau 生肉包

 A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

Recipe calls for Hong Kong flour

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

Kneading with the hand

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

Sir-fried the ingredients and let to cool

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

 A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef - Learning to make steamed barbecue-flavored char siew pau 叉燒包, lap cheong pau 臘腸包 and sang yoke pau 生肉包

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

A Long Journey to Be a Pau / Bao Chef

Steaming hot pau out of the steamer

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