Archive for the ‘Koay Teow Th’ng’ Category

BY CK Lam

The secret is in the soup

The light and flavorful noodle dish of koay teow th’ng is a popular hawker food across Penang.  One place that many would head to for a bowl of koay teow th’ng (flat rice noodle) is the stall located on Clarke Street – a street between Argyll Road and Hutton Lane.

Hidden in a small alley, you will find the koay teow th’ng stall that has been running for more than 30 years.

Koay Teow Th’ng at Clarke Street, Penang by what2seeonline.com
A bowl of koay teow th’ng prepared with beehoon

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BY CK Lam

The Cecil Street Market Food Court in Penang has wafting aromas of food emanating from its rows of hawker stalls. You can find just about any hawker food in the large food court, commonly known as “chit teow lor ban san” (7th road market), named after the well-known market located right beside it. The last few years saw the upgrading of this food court that gave it its more polished eating environment, but the price and serving portion remain reasonable.

A firm favourite is the koay teow thng from Lum Lai, flat rice noodle served in a bowl of clear and flavourful soup. Toppings include pieces of fish cakes, springy fish balls, blood jelly and shredded duck meat. Add-ons, such as a whole duck drumstick, its liver or gizzard, are also available.

Penang Hawker Food at Cecil Street Market Food Court, Penang by what2seeonline.com

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BY CK Lam

Penang is bursting with restaurants and hawker food stalls but some of the most outstanding are those in inner George Town, particularly along Kimberley Street. It is where the crowds go for a variety of flavours and indulgences.

The area is overwhelming with hawker delights. With most stalls and eateries beginning operation at night, just a walk up and down this historical street will bring you face to face with some of the best hawker food! Enjoy such fare as koay chiap, economy fried beehoon, char kway teow, sweet boiled Chinese desserts, lok-lok and kway teow th’ng.

Street food crawl at Kimberley Street, Penang by what2seeonline.com

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BY CK Lam

A friend tipped me off to a coffee shop serving hand-pulled noodles on the busy Macalister Road. This fairly new stall offers freshly hand-pulled noodles (la mian) and koay teow th’ng. Other specialties include homemade prawn wanton and fish balls.

The owner Mr Loh starts his day by making the hand-pulled noodles at the kitchen. The hand-pulled noodles have a certain tenderness and texture, which is greatly distinct from mass made noodles. The noodle is available in two sizes – either thick rounded or string-thin. Mr Loh quoted that the texture and mouth feel of the noodles are as important as flavor!

We had several varieties, starting with the spicy “ma la” noodle, which is the highlight in 173. Mr Loh had the hand-pulled noodles dipped in boiling water. The blanched fine noodle is served with black sauce with a dollop of chili-red paste (also handmade), a Sichuan specialty with heat of chilies and numbing Sichuan peppercorns.

Priced at RM3.50, the dish comes with pieces of BBQ pork (char siew), chicken, fish balls, vegetables and aromatic chili paste. With the right thickness and nice chewy bite, the noodles absorbed every drop of robust flavor from the spicy and tingly chili paste. For those who prefer less spicy, be sure to inform Mr Loh.

Hand-pulled Noodles at 173 Macalister Road by CK Lam of what2seeonline.com

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Koay Teow Th’ng, also commonly known as KTT is a popular hawker food for Penangites besides the overwhelmingly famous Char Koay Teow, Assam Laksa and Hokkien Mee. Lately I have been patronizing the Duck Meat Koay Teow Th’ng at Lum Lai located in Cecil Street Market Hawker Center, located just beside the bustling Cecil Street Market. This street is also known as Chit Tiau Lor to Penangites which represent the 7th Road in that precinct.

Koay Teow Thng at Lebuh Cecil Market food court
Duck meat Koay Teow Th’ng!

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Chinese New Year is just around the corner and many of us will be celebrating this special event with our loved ones. As in all festival, there are bound to be plenty of food and Chinese New Year is no exception. I am sure all of us will be having a fun time eating and tasting variety of cuisine.

I like to take this opportunity to wish all the readers of What2see, GONG XI FA CAI and thank you all for your valuable support. May you be blessed with happiness, success and good health in this coming Year of the Ox!

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Restaurant May Foong is an old establishment in Bagan Dalam, Butterworth, Penang which is famous for its Ipoh Hor Fun, Steam Chicken (pak cham kai) and Prawn Dumpling (wanton). It is located nearby another famous dim sum eatery, Sweet Paradise Restaurant.

The Hor Fun has the smoothness and silkiness in it, exactly like the ones we had in Thean Chun coffeeshop in old town, Ipoh. There are two version, the dry ones and the soup ones. The dry ones are served with some light sauce instead of the usual black thick sauce. The soup is very clear and tasted the same as those in Ipoh but only lack the redness appearance.

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Believe it or not – Eel Fishball??? That is what we found out in the Rasa-Rasa Penang book. It feature a Koay teow thng (koay teow soup) stall in Lebuh Pitt which sells fishball made from eel (mua hoo in Hokkien) meat. In order to kill our curiosity, we just have to try it.

It is the “lone ranger” stall in Heng Seng Coffeeshop at Pitt Street and Armenian Street junction.

A basic bowl of Koay teow thng comes with slices of duck meat, sliced mince meat and five balls. The fish ball is not as “bouncy” as those sold by most of the stalls and the smell is not that strong. The clear soup is a chicken and duck based soup. The sliced mince meat was tasty. Extra ingredients can be added on to your liking.

The chili padi that are served to the customers are ready mixed with garlic and soak in soya sauce. It enhance the taste of the soya sauce.

Updates : The stall has since moved to another shop further up the road in January 2009. Click here for the       new location.

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